Alejandro J. Ganimian, How Much Are Latin American Children Learning?  Highlighs from the Second Regional Student Achievement Test (SERCE)  Washingotn DC: Partnership for Educational Revitalization in the Americas (PREAL), 2009.

 

Cuba outscored other nations in the first comparative study of learning in Latin America, conducted by UNESCO’s Laboratory for Assessment of the Quality of Education in 1998.  The second regional assessment was conducted in 2006, building upon the first but adding more countries, different grade levels, and a new subject (science).  How Much Are Latin American Children Learning?  offers a summary report on the second regional assessment.  Note Cuban children’s scores!

 

 

 

Martin Carnoy, with Amber K. Gove and Jeffery H. Marshall.  Cuba’s Academic Advantage:  Why Students in Cuba Do Better in School.  Palo Alto, CA:  Stanford University Press, 2007.

 

Carnoy, Gove, and Marshall examine the “academic advantage” that lies behind the significantly higher scores of Cuban students in the two regional assessments of student learning in Latin America (1998 and 2006).   The authors propose a social context frame to compare the Cuban case to Chile and Brazil, arguing that family and state-generated social capital help explain student performance.

 

For a review of the book, see Sheryl Lutjens, “Review of Martin Carnoy, with Amber K. Gove and Jeffery H. Marshall, Cuba’s Academic Advantage:  Why Students in Cuba Do Better in School” Comparative Education Review 53, no. 1 (February 2009): 147-149.

Resources

Here are selected resources that will help you prepare for the trip!

 


 

Fructuoso Rodríguez School for Hearing and Visually-Impaired Children, Santa Clara

 

Young blind students
 
Young blind students